David M. Pierce

David M. Pierce

Biography

Education

  • 2007:
Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, California, United States
  • 2007:
Ph.D. Minor – Mathematics (P.Mn.), Stanford University, California, United States
  • 2001:
M.S. Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, California, United States
  • 1997:
B.S. Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, United States

Professional Appointments

  • 10/07 – 9/13:
Universitätsassistent, Institute of Biomechanics, Graz University of Technology, Austria
  • 9/06 – 9/07:
Associate, A.M. Fitgerald & Associates, LLC., California, United States
  • 9/03 – 9/06:
Research Assistant, Stanford University/Sandia National Laboratories, California/New Mexico, United States
  • 3/04 – 6/04:
Teaching Affiliate, Stanford University, California, United States
  • 6/03 – 9/03:
Research Assistant, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, United States
  • 6/02 – 9/02:
Research Assistant, Sandia National Laboratories, California, United States
  • 9/00 – 9/01:
Research Assistant, Stanford University/Cisco Systems, California, United States
  • 6/00 – 9/00:
Research Assistant, Center for Design Research/Paramount Bed Company, California/Tokyo, United States/Japan
  • 12/98 – 9/99:
Mechanical Design Engineer, Rosemount Inc., Minnesota, United States

Publications

H. Weisbecker, D.M. Pierce and G.A. Holzapfel [pdf]

A generalized prestressing algorithm for finite element simulations of pre-loaded geometries with application to the aorta.
International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering, in press.

J. Tarjuelo‐Gutierrez, B. Rodriguez‐Vila, D.M. Pierce, T.E. Fastl, P. Verbrugghe, I. Fourneau, G. Maleux, P. Herijgers, G.A. Holzapfel and E.J. Gomez [pdf]

High-quality conforming hexahedral meshes of patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms including their intraluminal thrombi.
Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing, in press.

D.M. Pierce, T. Ricken and G.A. Holzapfel [pdf]

A hyperelastic biphasic fiber-reinforced model of articular cartilage considering distributed collagen fiber orientations: continuum basis, computational aspects and applications.
Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering, in press.

D.M. Pierce, T. Ricken and G.A. Holzapfel [pdf]

Modeling sample/patient-specific structural and diffusional response of cartilage employing DT-MRI.
Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering, 29:807-821, 2013.

H. Weisbecker, C. Viertler, D.M. Pierce and G.A. Holzapfel [pdf]

The role of elastin and collagen in the softening behavior of the human thoracic aortic media.
Journal of Biomechanics, 46:1859-1865, 2013.

A.J. Schriefl, A.J. Reinisch, S. Sankaran, D.M. Pierce and G.A. Holzapfel [pdf]

Quantitative assessment of collagen fiber orientations from 2D images of soft biological tissues.
Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 9:3081-3093, 2012.

A.J. Schriefl, M.J. Collins, D.M. Pierce, G.A. Holzapfel, L.E. Niklason and J.D. Humphrey [pdf]

Remodeling of intramural thrombus and collagen in an Ang-II infusion ApoE-/- model of dissecting aortic aneurysms.
Thrombosis Research, 130:e139-e146, 2012.

H. Weisbecker, D.M. Pierce, P. Regitnig and G.A. Holzapfel [pdf]

Layer-specific damage experiments and modeling of human thoracic and abdominal aortas with non-atherosclerotic intimal thickening.
Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, 12:93-106, 2012.

A.J. Schriefl, G. Zeindlinger, D.M. Pierce, P. Regitnig and G.A. Holzapfel [pdf]

Determination of the layer-specific distributed collagen fiber orientations in human thoracic and abdominal aortas and common iliac arteries.
Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 9:1275-1286, 2012.

M.B. Lilledahl, D.M. Pierce, T. Ricken, G.A. Holzapfel and C. de Lange Davies [pdf]

Structural analysis of articular cartilage using multiphoton microscopy: input for biomechanical modeling.
IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, 30:1635-1648, 2011.

D.M. Pierce, W. Trobin, J.G. Raya, S. Trattnig, H. Bischof, Ch. Glaser and G.A. Holzapfel [pdf]

DT-MRI based computation of collagen fiber deformation in human articular cartilage: a feasibility study.
Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 38:2447-2463, 2010.

A.M. Fitzgerald, D.M. Pierce, B.M. Huigens and C.D. White [pdf]

A general methodology to predict the reliability of single crystal silicon MEMS devices.
IEEE/ASME Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, 18:962-970, 2009.

D.M. Pierce, W. Trobin, S. Trattnig, H. Bischof, G.A. Holzapfel [pdf]

A phenomenological approach toward patient-specific computational modeling of articular cartilage including collagen fiber tracking.
ASME Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, 131:091006, 2009 (12 pages).

D.M. Pierce, S.D. Sheppard and P.T. Vianco [pdf]

A general methodology to predict fatigue life in lead-free solder alloy interconnects.
ASME Journal of Electronic Packaging, 131:011008, 2009 (11 pages).

D.M. Pierce, W. Trobin and G.A. Holzapfel [pdf]

A computational framework for patient-specific analysis of articular cartilage incorporating structural information from DT-MRI.
GAMM-Mitteilungen, 32:157-177, 2009.

A.M. Fitzgerald, D.M. Pierce, C.D. White, B.M. Huigens and J.W. Eaton

Fracture prediction of single crystal silicon MIMS under multi-axial loading.
2008 Hilton Head Workshop on Sensors and Actuators, Tech. Digest, Hilton Head Island, SC, June 1-5, 2008.

D.M. Pierce, S.D. Sheppard, P.T. Vianco, J.A. Regent and J.M. Grazier [pdf]

Fatigue life prediction methodology for lead-free solder alloy interconnects: development and validation.
In: "Proceedings of the IPC/JEDEC Global Conference on Lead Free Reliability & Reliability Testing for RoHS Lead Free Electronics", Boston, MA (2007), IPC LDFR0407-CD 07, 1-20.

D.M. Pierce, S.D. Sheppard, P.T. Vianco, J.A. Regent and J.M. Grazier [pdf]

Validation of a general fatigue life prediction methodology for Sn-Ag-Cu lead-free solder alloy interconnects.
ASME Journal of Electronic Packaging, 13:011003, 2008.

D.M. Pierce, S.D. Sheppard, A.F. Fossum, P.T. Vianco, and M.K. Neilsen [pdf]

Development of the damage state variable for a unified creep plasticity damage constitutive model of the 95.5Sn-3.9Ag-0.6Cu for lead-free solder.
ASME Journal of Electronic Packaging, 13:011002, 2008.

D.M. Pierce, S.D. Sheppard and P.T. Vianco [pdf]

Continuum damage mechanics based failure prediction methodology for 95.5Sn-3.9Ag-0.6Cu solder alloy interconnects in electronic packaging.
Thesis: Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, pp. 423, 2007.

A.F. Fossum, P.T. Vianco, M.K. Neilsen and D.M. Pierce [pdf]

A practical viscoplastic damage model for lead-free solder.
ASME Journal of Electronic Packaging, 128:71-81, 2006.

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Pierce received his B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Minnesota – Minneapolis in 1997. After graduating, he worked as a Mechanical Design Engineer and analyst at Rosemount Inc. in Minnesota. He then returned to school at Stanford University where he completed his M.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering in 2001. He decided to continue his studies and entered the Doctoral program at Stanford immediately.

On March 3rd of 2006 he successfully defended his Ph.D. Thesis titled, "Continuum Damage Mechanics Based Failure Prediction Methodology for 95.5Sn-3.9Ag-0.6Cu Solder Alloy Interconnects in Electronic Packaging." His thesis research was guided by Professor Sheri D. Sheppard, in close collaboration with technical researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque NM. He initiated a strategic alliance between Stanford and SNL to develop and validate a lead-free solder interconnect fatigue life prediction methodology. In this body of research Dr. Pierce proposed new fatigue life prediction methodology, based on the unique subroutine capabilities, which extends the highly successful energy-based approaches. This methodology predicts thermal mechanical fatigue crack growth in lead-free solder joints as verified by empirical data for a ball grid array assembly.

During his last year at Stanford University he completed a Ph.D.-Minor in the Mathematics Department (emphasizing partial differential equations of applied mathematics; computational methods for fronts, interfaces and waves; real analysis; and linear algebra and matrix theory) while working part-time for a private firm as a consulting analyst in computational mechanics and finite element modeling. In the latter capacity Dr. Pierce completed variety of consulting and research projects for the following applications: MEMS, solar cells, engineering materials, sensor systems and medical devices. The variety of research and work has generated numerous journal publications and one US patent. His research interests focus on theory, development and application of computational methods for time-dependent physical problems of practical importance. Core competencies include: computational mechanics, finite element methods, solid mechanics, applied mathematics, continuum (damage) mechanics, fatigue analysis, development of analysis/design tools and related computer programming/software.

In his free time he enjoys road cycling, alpine skiing and hiking.